AMD Firmly Denies that Windows 11 Affects Ryzen 7000 Gaming Performance

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Following the release of Windows 11 a little over a year ago, while the operating system has undoubtedly had its share of problems, one of the most consistent subjects when it comes to processors is that AMD Ryzen CPUs supposedly perform notably worse after making the transition from Windows 10. – This isn’t, incidentally, a new theory either. It first happened (or was at least suggested) with the Ryzen 5000 platform and we’ve subsequently seen similar claims, once again, being made with Ryzen 7000.

Following an official statement, however, AMD has said that while they will continue to investigate the matter, they’ve found no concrete evidence to suggest that their Ryzen 7000 processors perform any better or worse on Windows 11 than on Windows 10.

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AMD Denies Windows 11 Affects Ryzen 7000 Performance

Following the initial launch of Windows 11, we did actually thoroughly test a Ryzen CPU before and after the ‘upgrade’ to the new operating system and our results found, overall, that there was barely any notable difference between the CPU’s performance on either version. Making the chipset upgrade did, of course, help, but not by any notably huge margin. – In other words, Ryzen 2XXX to Ryzen 5XXX seems pretty solid regardless of whether you were on Windows 10 or 11 (click here to see our full test).

It seems, however, that speculation has, once again, arisen on this subject, but this time with Ryzen 7000 being the key focus of attention. – On this matter, however, AMD has pretty much flatly denied that they’ve encountered any notable performance differences between the operating systems:

“We have been made aware of reports of unexpected performance deltas in certain games with AMD Ryzen desktop processors as well as performance variances between Windows 11 and Windows 10 in certain game titles. We are currently investigating but based on testing to date have not observed a material difference in game performance between OS versions across a variety of operating scenarios and game titles.

Many factors affect gaming performance, including the game engine, CPU architecture, GPU selection and memory choices. As new architectures enter the market, we often observe performance anomalies which must be addressed by the component vendor or the game publisher. This is not a new phenomenon nor is it unexpected.

As we have done since the introduction of Ryzen, when these performance anomalies are brought to light we will use them to steer our partner engagements with game developers and ecosystem hardware partners to implement optimizations that eliminate the variations.”

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What Do We Think?

Based on our prior work on this matter, we see no reason to dispute AMD’s claim here. Quite frankly, if there was a problem with Ryzen 7000 on Windows 11, if Team Red didn’t confirm it, then sooner or later, Microsoft would. And so far, both seem to agree that Windows 11 is perfectly fine with the new series of CPUs.

Despite this though, it still won’t stop the overall consumer feeling that Microsoft feels a lot happier having Intel in its bed than it does AMD.

What do you think though? Would you like us to test this theory ourselves with a Ryzen 7000 CPU? – If so, let us know in the comments!

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